Lawn Care and Landscaping in Bucks County, PA
PO Box 32, Jamison, PA 18929
Monday - Friday: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
17 Jul 2018

Why is My Grass Brown?

Tom Eckhardt

Tom Eckhardt

CEO, Jamison Lawn Care

You’re wondering why your grass went from a dark, beautiful green to a dead looking yellow brown?

Don’t worry! In our area, this is commonplace for this time of year. I’ll explain below. 

In our zone (7A), the most common turf type is a mix of Rye, Fescue, and Bluegrass. These are referred to as “Cool Season Grasses”, meaning they survive best in temperatures from 60 degrees to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a contrast from warm season grasses, such as St. Augustine, Zoysia, and Bermuda. Warm season grasses perform best in temperatures ranging from 80 degrees to 95 degrees Fahrenheit. 

 

Temperature is very important in cool season grasses. Once the temperature reaches out of the optimum range, the grass will go into dormancy. Dormancy is when the grass’ growing, development, and physical activities stop to preserve energy. Essentially, the grass goes into hibernation to get it through the heat. 

Irrigation is also a consideration in dormancy. If you have a irrigation system, the grass still has the possibility of going into dormancy. Your irrigation system cannot put out enough water to keep the grass totally green. The only thing that can shorten dormancy is good, consistent rainfall.

Dormancy is totally normal and should not be worried about. In fact, you should be happy that the grass is protecting itself through the heat so it can once again be beautiful once the temperatures drop. Usually dormancy happens in July and August. Once the temperatures start to drop in September, and rainfall starts to pick up, your grass will return to its original green. 

In regards to fertilizing, usually it is not recommended when the grass is in dormancy. You can get away with still building your soil with nutrients, but be wary of using high nitrogen fertilizers, which will push top growth in the heat, which will damage the turf and possibly introduce fungi.

If your lawn is a mixture of brown and green, you probably have a mixture of cool season and warm season grasses. This is normal as well, as it is common to sew both types to maintain green year round.   

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us. If I do not have the answer, I will consult with the Penn state extension and get the answer on your behalf. 

 

Tom

16 Jul 2018

Your Lawn is Like Your Car

Your Lawn is Like Your Car

Tom Eckhardt

Tom Eckhardt

Owner, Jamison Lawn Care

Cars are one of the biggest investments that we make in our lifetimes. Usually the only bigger investment…is our homes. We maintain our cars by investing in maintenance, repair, and cleaning. We also maintain our homes by doing the same thing. In this article, you’ll find that these two investments are much more alike than you have ever thought!

In my previous career, I was a highly talented vehicle mechanic. I started at the local oil change place, and worked my way up to working on armored tractor trailers that transported the nation’s most expensive resources. It is easy for me to compare your home and vehicles – but have you ever thought about it this way? Let’s dive into it. 

 
We all know by know that homes are expensive! We save our hard earned wages furiously in efforts to purchase our homes – and then we spend even more to maintain and upgrade our dream home. In comparison, we also save our money and invest more to maintain our vehicles. 

 

By now, you know why we need to perform ongoing maintenance to our vehicles.  It keeps your car going strong, prevents breakdowns, and even more expensive repairs. You willingly invest your money into maintenance to prevent future loss of money. Maintenance is investing – not spending – and it has a great return on investment. 

Lawns also need sustenance and maintenance to survive. Just like maintenance on your car, lawns require ongoing work to survive. Proper mowing height, blade sharpness, irrigation, fertilizing, and weed control is your work schedule to keep your lawn healthy and prevent more costly repairs in the future.

Your lawn is not frivolously spending money – it is also an investment. Whether it be with time or money, it requires an investment. Repairs can cost thousands of dollars, whereas ongoing maintenance is less. Even after you repair a damaged lawn, you still need to keep up with it to prevent more repairs in the future. 

Can you see why it is so important to invest your time and money in your lawn? It is not only an attractive landscape to look at, it is an investment in your home. When you bought your house, did you look inside or outside first? You probably saw the outside first. The outside is what made your first impression. 

Just like you spending money to keep your car healthy and reliable, lawns also require the same attention. 

Invest in your lawn and you invest in your future well being. It is not easy, but it is worth it. 

 

 

Tom

 

 

 

01 Jun 2017

What Should I Look For In a Landscaper?

Choosing The Best Landscaper

 

Picking a landscape contractor is no easy feat

 

You search endless pages of Google and Yelp to find the perfect fit. How do you narrow that down?

 

Choosing a landscape contractor is like choosing a realtor. There are so many to choose from, but you want to be certain that person will be the right fit. Here are some things to consider:

 

  1. Professionalism
    1. Does the contractor represent themselves in a professional manner? That includes their website, logo, equipment, and uniforms.
    2. I see so many landscape companies that don’t wear uniforms. Any other business will provide uniforms! This shows their pride in representing their brand.
    3. Do they contact you back in a timely manner and answer all your questions and concerns?
  2. Business Systems
    1. Creating systems is the hardest part of running a business.
    2. Does your prospect company have these systems in place? Such as scheduling, communications, and billing?
    3. How easy is it to pay for services? Do they only take cash? Or do they take credit card, check, or cash? What would be best for your situation? Do they bill by service, monthly, or weekly?
  3. Reviews
    1. Check all the review sites about your prospective contractor. Check the good and bad reviews. Most bad reviews are complaints that were not timely and accurately fixed. This gives you a good idea how the contractor will treat you!
  4. Completed Project Photos
    1. Does the contractor have photos of their completed work? Pay attention to small details, such as mulch overflowing onto sidewalks and missed cutting spots.

 

Those are just some of the things to consider when hiring your next landscape contractor. Are there other things that we missed? Comment below to help others out!

 

Tom Eckhardt

Owner

 

Jamison Lawn Care is located in Bucks County, PA. We serve Jamison, Warrington, Warminster, Ivyland, Southampton, and Furlong, Pa. These blogs are provided to better educate ourselves on landscape business.

 

 

 

27 May 2017

Should I Use Landscape Fabric?

Common Landscape Misconception

Landscape fabric has its place and time on your property.

One place it doesn’t belong is in your mulch beds!

 

Why do I say this!?

 

Let’s get into the theory of mulch first!

 

Mulch is made up of natural resources. Some mulches are shredded bark, pine tree needles, straw, and many other “wood” types. Note, there is rubber mulch available now, but do not give the same benefits as natural.

As this wood decomposes in your garden beds, it turns into beautiful, rich, dark black soil. This decomposed soil then amends your top soil and provides nutrients. Before it breaks down, it also retains moisture for plants, and prevents weeds.

 

So now that we now that natural mulch breaks down into soil, we can start talking about landscape fabric.

 

The main objective of landscape fabric is to prevent weeds. Which, quite frankly, does nothing if you properly mulch to a depth of 2″-3″. Proper mulch depth prevents the weed seeds from getting sunlight and germinating.

 

As we go back into the natural mulch, remember that it leaves a nice rich soil after it decomposes. This soil is now on top of the landscape fabric, with the natural mulch now decomposed. This provides an environment of sunlight and dampness necessary for weed seeds and turf to grow. Where does it grow? Right on top of that expensive landscape fabric that you so painstakingly put down. That renders the landscape fabric completely useless, after a few years.

 

Not only does the landscape fabric become useless, it also prevents proper moisture from entering your soil. Take this picture for example. This was on one of our client’s properties. Notice how dry and compacted the soil is.

 

 

 

There is a place and time for landscape fabric. For example, if you are using rock as “mulch”. When in natural mulched garden beds- the fabric must go!

 

 

 

Jamison Lawn Care is a proud provider of landscape and lawn care services in Jamison, PA, Warrington, PA, Warminster, PA, Furlong, PA, Hatboro, PA, and Southampton, PA. We provide these landscape educational blogs at no cost to better educate homeowners in Bucks County and Montgomery County, PA.

 

 

 

Tom Eckhardt

Owner, Jamison Lawn Care