Lawn Care and Landscaping in Bucks County, PA
PO Box 32, Jamison, PA 18929
Monday - Friday: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
17 Jul 2018

Why is My Grass Brown?

Tom Eckhardt

Tom Eckhardt

CEO, Jamison Lawn Care

You’re wondering why your grass went from a dark, beautiful green to a dead looking yellow brown?

Don’t worry! In our area, this is commonplace for this time of year. I’ll explain below. 

In our zone (7A), the most common turf type is a mix of Rye, Fescue, and Bluegrass. These are referred to as “Cool Season Grasses”, meaning they survive best in temperatures from 60 degrees to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a contrast from warm season grasses, such as St. Augustine, Zoysia, and Bermuda. Warm season grasses perform best in temperatures ranging from 80 degrees to 95 degrees Fahrenheit. 

 

Temperature is very important in cool season grasses. Once the temperature reaches out of the optimum range, the grass will go into dormancy. Dormancy is when the grass’ growing, development, and physical activities stop to preserve energy. Essentially, the grass goes into hibernation to get it through the heat. 

Irrigation is also a consideration in dormancy. If you have a irrigation system, the grass still has the possibility of going into dormancy. Your irrigation system cannot put out enough water to keep the grass totally green. The only thing that can shorten dormancy is good, consistent rainfall.

Dormancy is totally normal and should not be worried about. In fact, you should be happy that the grass is protecting itself through the heat so it can once again be beautiful once the temperatures drop. Usually dormancy happens in July and August. Once the temperatures start to drop in September, and rainfall starts to pick up, your grass will return to its original green. 

In regards to fertilizing, usually it is not recommended when the grass is in dormancy. You can get away with still building your soil with nutrients, but be wary of using high nitrogen fertilizers, which will push top growth in the heat, which will damage the turf and possibly introduce fungi.

If your lawn is a mixture of brown and green, you probably have a mixture of cool season and warm season grasses. This is normal as well, as it is common to sew both types to maintain green year round.   

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us. If I do not have the answer, I will consult with the Penn state extension and get the answer on your behalf. 

 

Tom

16 Jul 2018

Your Lawn is Like Your Car

Your Lawn is Like Your Car

Tom Eckhardt

Tom Eckhardt

Owner, Jamison Lawn Care

Cars are one of the biggest investments that we make in our lifetimes. Usually the only bigger investment…is our homes. We maintain our cars by investing in maintenance, repair, and cleaning. We also maintain our homes by doing the same thing. In this article, you’ll find that these two investments are much more alike than you have ever thought!

In my previous career, I was a highly talented vehicle mechanic. I started at the local oil change place, and worked my way up to working on armored tractor trailers that transported the nation’s most expensive resources. It is easy for me to compare your home and vehicles – but have you ever thought about it this way? Let’s dive into it. 

 
We all know by know that homes are expensive! We save our hard earned wages furiously in efforts to purchase our homes – and then we spend even more to maintain and upgrade our dream home. In comparison, we also save our money and invest more to maintain our vehicles. 

 

By now, you know why we need to perform ongoing maintenance to our vehicles.  It keeps your car going strong, prevents breakdowns, and even more expensive repairs. You willingly invest your money into maintenance to prevent future loss of money. Maintenance is investing – not spending – and it has a great return on investment. 

Lawns also need sustenance and maintenance to survive. Just like maintenance on your car, lawns require ongoing work to survive. Proper mowing height, blade sharpness, irrigation, fertilizing, and weed control is your work schedule to keep your lawn healthy and prevent more costly repairs in the future.

Your lawn is not frivolously spending money – it is also an investment. Whether it be with time or money, it requires an investment. Repairs can cost thousands of dollars, whereas ongoing maintenance is less. Even after you repair a damaged lawn, you still need to keep up with it to prevent more repairs in the future. 

Can you see why it is so important to invest your time and money in your lawn? It is not only an attractive landscape to look at, it is an investment in your home. When you bought your house, did you look inside or outside first? You probably saw the outside first. The outside is what made your first impression. 

Just like you spending money to keep your car healthy and reliable, lawns also require the same attention. 

Invest in your lawn and you invest in your future well being. It is not easy, but it is worth it. 

 

 

Tom